Bound

Movie Review By Anthony Leong © Copyright 1997


Caesar (Joe Pantaliano, who you may remember as the short annoying police chief in "Bad Boys"), a money-launderer for the Mafia. Violet (Meg Tilly), his manipulative moll. Corky (Gina Gershon), the recently-paroled thief who's renovating the apartment next door. And two million dollars. With a noxious combination like this, someone's going to be dead by the end of the day.

My first impression of "Bound" was that it would be just another one of those films in the long line of the 'lethal lesbian' genre (which includes such films as "Basic Instinct", "Heavenly Creatures", and "I Shot Andy Warhol"). However, with first-rate directing by the Wachowski brothers and the portrayal of Violet and Corky as very rational human beings (as opposed to the ever-popular psychotic stereotype), I was pleasantly surprised by this taut thriller. The first act of the story involves the rapturous love affair between Violet and Corky, who meet on the elevator one morning. Violet is a virtual prisoner under Caesar and desperately wants to break free, and Corky is the only one who can help her. The second act has Caesar bringing home two million dollars that was recovered from skim-scam by one of his associates. In a brilliant sequence that juxtaposes the planning and the execution, Violet and Corky come up with a plot to steal the money and frame Caesar for its disappearance. The tension is high in the final act as Violet and Corky try to outmaneuver Caesar in a bid to get away with their almost perfect plan. However, like all best-laid plans, things go wrong and unexpected contingencies come up...

This film is highlighted by inventive camera work, with the use of odd camera angles to convey the tension and paranoia of the situation, creative transition sequences, cool slo-mo tracking shots, and 'beautifully'-shot sequences of gunplay that would put John Woo to shame. Couple this with the machinations of the story, and you have one film definitely worth renting.


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